PARKER LAB PEOPLE

Scroll down for Postdocs, Graduate Students, Undergraduate Researchers, and Key Collaborators. For the archive of past lab members, click here.

IngridParker_PersonalProfileINGRID M. PARKER, P.I.
Office:  CBB 260
Phone: 831-459-5017
Email: imparker<at> ucsc.edu 
For more about my research interests in biological invasions, plant-pathogen interactions, the evolution of domestication in the tropics, and conserving endangered plants, see my RESEARCH page.

 


shapeimage_2-1SARA GROVE, POSTDOC

Office:  CBB 164
Email: sgrove <at> ucsc.edu 

My research broadly addresses the ecology of plants and the application of science to improve invasive species management and restoration success. I investigate the impacts of introduced invasive plants on native plant populations, communities, and ecosystem processes. My current work examines the abiotic and biotic mechanisms by which a widespread invasive shrub, Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius), limits reforestation success. Specifically, I test the hypothesis that changes in nutrient availability, allelopathy, and the disruption of the mycorrhizal mutualism that result from Scotch broom invasion, remain as soil legacies that ultimately hinder Douglas-fir establishment. A major component of my research examines the temporal dynamics of these invasive species impacts and I am currently investigating both the development of soil legacies over time following invasion as well as their persistence with time following invader removal.  My research is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation.


courteneyCOURTENAY RAY
Office:  D312 EMS
Email: courtenay.ray <at> ucsc.edu

I am interested in species distributions, community assembly, and functional traits, especially in stringent environments. I am currently researching grasses in the Colombian tropical alpine, with a focus on the genus Cortaderia. Since 2011, I have also been studying the invasive grass, Ehrharta erecta, focusing on species impacts and management methods.

 

KAREN E. TANNER
Office:  CBB 164
Email: karen.e.tanner <at> gmail.com

I study the effects of anthropogenic change on annual plant demography and community composition in California’s Mojave Desert, currently undergoing a renewable energy boom. This region is home to many rare and special-status species – how can we detect these species, avoid impacting them, and mitigate impacts when they can’t be avoided? I combine observational and experimental approaches to gain insight into desert annual performance in natural and human-modified landscapes. Desert annuals exhibit strong response to microsite heterogeneity and moisture availability; can the response of plants to these sources of natural variation help us predict demographic response in human-modified landscapes? I use matrix models to compare performance of closely related rare and common annuals (Eriophyllum mohavense and Eriophyllum wallacei) in different microsites and in an experimental shade treatment mimicking the effects of a photovoltaic array.

 


CURRENT KEY COLLABORATORS

DSC00322 GREGORY S. GILBERTThreeCloseup
Department of Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz
JoinDSC02898t projects: Plant disease ecology, novel plant-pathogen interactions, biological invasions, tropical ecology, forest dynamics, phyloecology, inquiry-based learning, graduate training, salsa dancing, F1.

 

 

DSC00613KAREN A. HAUBENSAK
Department of Forestry, Northern Arizona University
Joint projects: Plant invasion, forest regeneration, soil legacy effects of invasion, allelopathy, plant-microbe interactions, saving the world from Scotch broom.

 

 

KarenGoodell

 KAREN GOODELL
Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology
Ohio State University
Joint projects: Response of native plant-pollinator interactions to invasive plants, policy and management of the impacts of invasive species, meta-analysis of invasion impacts.

 

 

CURRENT & RECENT UNDERGRADUATES

jennJENNIFER THOMPSON
Allelopathic alkaloids of an invasive shrub and their effect on the growth of ectomycorrhizal fungi.
nikkiNIKKI HANSON
Ehrharta erecta: Competitive impacts on four California native understory species and comparison of two removal methods of an invasive exotic grass.
RYAN HEGSTAD
Effect of site, propagation type, and clearing on the reintroduction of an endangered wetland herb, Arenaria paludicola
droppedImageMEGAN BONTRAGER
Effects of Nitrogen enrichment and Scotch broom on mycorrhizal associations of Douglas fir.
KRYSTAL ACIERTO
Restoration of an Endangered Plant Species, Arenaria paludicola: Effect of Propagation Type, Competition, and Soil Moisture on Plant Success.
DSC00837ANDREW WEITZ
Dean’s Award for Undergraduate ResearchSeed bank recruitment across four populations of the endangered Santa Cruz wallflower, Erysimum teretifolium (Brassicaceae).
DSCN1881_2HOLLY MAKAGON
Ectomycorrhizal colonization of Douglas fir seedlings in Cytisus-invaded clearcuts: Variation across sites and with distance from adult trees.
DSC01434KELSEY WEBSTER
Dean’s Award for Undergraduate Research Effects of desiccation and soil characteristics on Arenaria paludicola, an endangered herb.
DSC00241ALEX FRIEMAN
Seasonal soil moisture dynamics and potential outplant success of the endangered plant Arenaria paludicola.