COURSES

IMP is on sabbatical for 2015-16, doing research at Estación Biológica Doñana in Seville, Spain.  She’ll be back teaching Plant Ecology in fall 2016!

Note to students trying to get into my courses after they are full: I cannot give you a permission code before the quarter starts.  However, do sign up for the course waitlist.  It’s a good idea to also send me an email explaining why you want to take the course (and why you were not able to register), so I can be aware of your situation.  DO come on the first day of class.  Anyone missing on the first day of class will be dropped from the registered class list and from the waiting list.

BIOE 145  PLANT ECOLOGY

DSC_0145This is my upper-division lecture course, which explores the ecology of plant form, function, distribution, abundance, and diversity.  Lecture topics include: ecological genetics and population structure, natural selection and local adaptation, physiological ecology, life history, demographic models, mating systems and pollination ecology, competition, plant-insect and plant-fungal interactions, community structure and succession, and biodiversity and ecosystem function.  Student assessment is based on two exams, five quizzes, two critical reviews of research articles, an experimental design paper, and a term assignment based on independent field observations and experiments.

BIOE 145L  FIELD METHODS IN PLANT ECOLOGY

DSC_0101This is a field/lab course in which ecological concepts and techniques are explored through weekly exercises in the field, laboratory, and greenhouse.  The class takes two field trips including a weekend at the Big Creek Reserve in Big Sur. Every week, we collect data that we then analyze using JMP statistical software. Students write an original research paper every week.  Topics included: responses to serpentine soil, water stress, pollination, seed dispersal, herbivory, and competition.  Emphasis is on experimental design, analysis, and interpretation  of results. In addition to the quality of their eight research papers, students are assessed based on a peer review, a final exam on statistics and experimental design, and the quality of their participation in group activities.  All students must be concurrently enrolled in Bioe 145.

BIOE 138 PLANTS AND SOCIETY: THE BIOLOGY OF FOOD, SHELTER, AND MEDICINE

DSC01926IMG_0831The goal of this course is to examine the relationship between plants and people using a multidisciplinary approach. By the end of the course, students have an appreciation of how specific plant components are used for food, fiber and medicine, and how human selection has shaped botanical form and function for specific purposes. Plant chemistry, physiology, biogeography, and biotechnology are examined from the perspective of social relevance.

BIOE 20B  STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF ORGANISMS

DSCN3829_5DSC02502The organismal quarter of the introductory biology sequence, of which I teach the plant section.  We cover photosynthesis, water relations, sensory systems, growth regulators, reproduction, plant disease, and plant chemistry.  Plants are awesome!
Student assessment is based on two exams, participation in section, a series of short lab assignments, and “Plant of the Week.”

CLEI 81B/EART 81B  FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

droppedImagedroppedImage_1Part of the pioneering freshman core sequence for College 8, this course covers both biological science (e.g. biodiversity, conservation) and physical science (e.g. global warming, pollution) aspects of environmental science.
Quantitative problem solving is an integral part of the course, comprising a substantial proportion of the two exams and eight problem sets. Students also participate in and write reports on two environmental action activities.

PAST COURSES AND SEMINARS TAUGHT:

• INCORPORATING SOCIAL SCIENCE INSIGHTS AND PRACTICES TO IMPROVE CONSERVATION OUTCOMES (GRADUATE SEMINAR WITH GREG GILBERT, JEFF BURY, and ISLAND CONSERVATION)

PLANT BIOLOGY, BEST OF  2014 (BIO 295, GRADUATE SEMINAR)

•  BIOLOGÍA POBLACIONAL DE PLANTAS (UNIVERSIDAD DE PANAMÁ)

• IMPACTS OF INVASIVE SPECIES (BIO 295, GRADUATE SEMINAR)

• EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY OF PLANT DISEASES (GRADUATE SEMINAR WITH GREG GILBERT)

• FOOD WEBS (GRADUATE SEMINAR WITH TIM TINKER)

• INVASION BIOLOGY (BIO 295, GRADUATE SEMINAR)

• ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION OF THE ISLANDS OF THE SEA OF CORTEZ (WITH DON CROLL)

• AWARD-WINNING PAPERS IN ECOLOGY (GRADUATE SEMINAR WITH LAUREL FOX)

• DESIGNING A MONITORING FRAMEWORK FOR MEASURING CONSERVATION SUCCESS (GRADUATE SEMINAR WITH DAN DOAK)

• ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION IN MARINE VS. TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS (BIO 293, GRADUATE SEMINAR)

• CONSERVATION BIOLOGY (MOUNTAIN LAKE BIOLOGICAL STATION, WITH PETER KAREIVA)

PLAGIARISM:

Greg and Ingrid’s Guide to Avoiding Plagiarism: Avoiding Plagiarism
A brief primer on Academic Integrity for UCSC Students, or Why cheating drives professors nuts & makes students cry (and how to avoid both)

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